Contact Us

Use the form on the right to contact us.

You can edit the text in this area, and change where the contact form on the right submits to, by entering edit mode using the modes on the bottom right. 

9408 Congress Saint Exd
Trumansburg, NY, 14886
United States

607.342.4953

Edible Acres is a 6 acre permaculture nursery and food forest farm located in Trumansburg, NY.  Focused on perennial, hardy, useful, edible and resilient plants, we use low and no tech solutions to grow out hundreds of different plants for our community!  We're excited to share what we do with you!

Biochar session - portable kilns.

Stories

Follow Edible Acres projects, experiments, successes, failures and ideas!  We're excited to share what works and what doesn't here!

Biochar session - portable kilns.

Sean Dembrosky

The other day I finally took down a white pine that had been dead for a few years.  Big base, probably close to 2' in diameter, and a ton of branchy, dead wood up top.  I thought it was a great opportunity to convert most of it into biochar for uses in potting mix, future raised beds in the area, and more.  I snapped a couple quick pictures of the before and after to share.  The yield was around maybe 6 wheelbarrows full of charcoal (I think a 6 cubic foot volume, so pretty substantial).  This took about 4 hours of hanging out, enjoying a fire.  

DSC01477.JPG

Above is the main kiln used.  I document this in a video on youtube... ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eo1xVWR9UPI )  It is made of used sheet metal roofing, cut to about 30" sections, and screwed together into a 10'-ish long flexible strip.  The 3 posts are simple tee posts hammered in to keep the form.

It was put together in about 3 minutes, on a flat place near the slash and debris to clean up.  Fire started in the bottom and material added as ready to go... I put my other portable kiln you can watch videos on ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lOSDwp20EKM ) next to it and used that too...  

This is what it looks like in the morning, after a few hours work cleaning up dead branches and burning them in these kilns, and then quenching them thoroughly with about 40 gallons of water each.   Sure, some ash in there, sure, some not fully burnt bits, but a TON of useful charcoal and a great use for otherwise dead, dry branch material.

This flexible, mobile, easy to create, super low cost approach can help you make a massive amount of charcoal.  Hopefully this gets some folks excited to try it out!

All cleaned up the next morning, the log chunks can be used to make benches and seating in other areas of the woods, the two kilns are sitting ready to be emptied...

All cleaned up the next morning, the log chunks can be used to make benches and seating in other areas of the woods, the two kilns are sitting ready to be emptied...